Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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Laura Walker graduated college with a BS in Criminal Justice with a minor in Political Science. She married her husband and began working in the family insurance business in 2005. She became a licensed agent and wrote P&C business focusing on personal lines insurance. Laura serviced existing business and wrote new business. She now uses her insurance background to help educate drivers about...

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Reviewed by Laura Walker
Licensed Agent for 10 Years

UPDATED: Jun 17, 2019

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Ranking fifth among affordable compact SUVs on U.S. News and World Report’s 2011 list, the Volkswagen Tiguan gets high marks for its turbocharged engine and athletic handling.

You’ll pay dearly for these attributes, though, since the 2011 Tiguan’s starting MSRP of $23,720 makes it one of the most expensive compact crossovers on the market.

Only the Nissan Xterra, the GMC Terrain, and the Ford Escape Hybrid cost more. Keep reading to find out what you can expect to pay to insure your 2011 Volkswagen Tiguan, or enter your zip code above for personalized quotes!

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Volkswagen Tiguan Auto Insurance Rates

The 2011 Volkswagen Tiguan is not nearly as expensive to insure as it is to buy in the first place. Edmunds estimates that Tiguan drivers will pay an average of $114 to insure the base model 4-door S trim.

The auto insurance rates that Edmunds projects for Toyota’s RAV4 compact SUV are slightly higher than the Tiguan’s, at $121 per month, and owners can expect to pay about $117 monthly to insure a Hyundai Tucson.

At the lower end of the range are the Chevrolet Equinox, with estimated monthly auto insurance rates of $113, and the Honda CR-V, with projected rates of just $105 per month.

Although the auto insurance rates for the base model Tiguan S are low, they rise quickly if you add features or opt for a higher level trim. For instance, simply adding all-wheel drive to your Tiguan S is likely to increase your rates by over $10 per month.

Repair Costs for a Volkswagen Tiguan

Edmunds projects that owners will pay approximately $1,067 for the Tiguan’s repairs during the first five years that they drive it.

The Chevy Equinox should cost its owners about $848 in repair expenditures over five years, while the CR-V, RAV4, and Tucson will only rack up repair bills of about $732 during the initial 5-year time frame.

Maintaining Your Volkswagen Tiguan

The estimated routine maintenance costs that Edmunds reports for the VW Tiguan S with 4Motion all-wheel drive are a pleasant surprise compared to its repair costs, which are a bit higher than competitors’.

Drivers can expect to pay just $44 for scheduled maintenance during the first year that they own the Tiguan. Second-year maintenance costs should be about $214, according to Edmunds, and they’re projected to be slightly more than double that figure in the third year.

The year four overhaul will total about $1,744, and year five maintenance expenses will be approximately $687.

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Scheduled maintenance costs should add up to around $3,161 over five years for the S trim with all-wheel drive, and just $3,028 for the S trim with front-wheel drive.

This figure is comparable to those for other compact SUVs like the Tucson, RAV4, and CR-V, but it is much lower than the Equinox’s projected 5-year routine maintenance costs of $4,000.

Fuel Economy for the 2011 Tiguan

Fuel economy is a bit of a weak point for the Tiguan, although its strong performance will justify this for some drivers. The base model Volkswagen Tiguan S gets 18 mpg around town and 26 mpg in highway driving.

Volkswagen reports that the Tiguan SE gets the same highway mileage as the S, but it achieves two more miles per gallon around town. Like the SE, the SEL model also gets 20 mpg in the city, but it gets just 25 mpg at highway speeds.

The poor fuel economy showing for the Tiguan S is due to its standard 6-speed manual transmission, which is less fuel efficient than the 6-speed automatic transmission that is standard equipment on the more expensive SE and SEL trims.

If you opt for Volkswagen’s signature 4Motion all-wheel drive, this will improve performance, but reduce gas mileage further.

Another important consideration is that the VW Tiguan requires premium fuel, which will significantly increase its fuel costs compared to those for its competitors.

For best-in-class fuel economy, consider the Ford Escape Hybrid or the Outlander Sport from Mitsubishi. The former delivers 30 city mpg and 27 highway mpg, while the latter offers an estimated 24 city mpg and 31 highway mpg.

If fuel economy is a key consideration for you, compact SUVs to probably avoid include the Jeep Liberty, Dodge Nitro, Nissan Xterra, and Jeep Wrangler. These vehicles all get 16 or fewer mpg in the city and 22 mpg or less on the highway.

Volkswagen Tiguan Safety Ratings and Equipment

The 2011 Tiguan may be impractical in many ways, but safety is not one of them. This compact SUV is on the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s “Top Safety Pick” list, which means that it aced crash tests and it offers electronic stability control as standard equipment.

The Tiguan hasn’t been crash tested yet by the federal government.

The standard airbag setup in the Tiguan includes dual front, front-side, and side curtain airbags. For extra protection, you can also opt for the supplemental side thorax airbags. The Tiguan model used in crash testing performed exceptionally well without these extra airbags, though.

Another standard safety feature for the Tiguan is the Intelligent Crash Response System, which automatically activates hazard lights, shuts off the fuel pump, and unlocks the Tiguan’s doors if a crash occurs.

2011 Tiguan Performance Reviews

With a 0-60 acceleration time of 7.8 seconds, the Tiguan is sprightly for an SUV, and its 2.0 liter turbocharged engine delivers 200 horsepower.

Car and Driver magazine says that while the RAV4 is more powerful than the Tiguan, VW’s compact SUV is the best-handling vehicle in its class. Kelley Blue Book calls the 2011 Tiguan’s overall drivability “above average.”

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